territoriality and home range concepts as applied to mammals pdf

Territoriality and home range concepts as applied to mammals pdf

File Name: territoriality and home range concepts as applied to mammals .zip
Size: 14719Kb
Published: 22.04.2021

Territoriality and Home Range Concepts as Applied to Mammals

Navigation menu

Foundations and Assumptions

Inferring the role of interactions in territorial animals relies upon accurate recordings of the behaviour of neighbouring individuals. Such accurate recordings are rarely available from field studies. As a result, quantification of the interaction mechanisms has often relied upon theoretical approaches, which hitherto have been limited to comparisons of macroscopic population-level predictions from un-tested interaction models.

Wayne D. Animals concentrate their activities within areas we call home ranges because information about places increases fitness. Most animals, and certainly all mammals, store information about places in cognitive maps—or neurally encoded representations of the geometric relations among places—and learn to associate objects or events with places on their map. I define the value of information as a time-dependent increment it adds to any appropriate currency of fitness for an informed versus an uninformed forager, and integrate it into simple conceptual models that help explain movements of animals that learn, forget, and use information. Unlike other space-use models, these recognize that movement decisions are based on an individual's imperfect and ever-changing expectancies about the environment—rather than omniscience or ignorance.

Territoriality and Home Range Concepts as Applied to Mammals

Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in. To purchase short term access, please sign in to your Oxford Academic account above. Don't already have an Oxford Academic account? Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide.

In ethology , territory is the sociographical area that an animal of a particular species consistently defends against conspecifics or, occasionally, animals of other species. Animals that defend territories in this way are referred to as territorial. Territoriality is only shown by a minority of species. More commonly, an individual or a group of animals has an area that it habitually uses but does not necessarily defend; this is called the home range. The home ranges of different groups of animals often overlap, or in the overlap areas, the groups tend to avoid each other rather than seeking to expel each other.

Navigation menu

D Corresponding author. Email: ronald. Radio-telemetry was used to investigate the home range and den characteristics of the brush-tailed rabbit-rat Conilurus penicillatus from three sites in the monsoonal tropics of the Northern Territory, Australia. Radio-tracking was conducted in a series of discontinuous 4—day sessions, over a 2-year period. The home ranges of 61 C. There were no significant differences in home-range size among the three sites or between wet and dry seasons, which suggests that vegetation structure, floristics and season play relatively little role in movements of C. The mean home-range size was 0.

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly. DOI: Burt Published Geography Journal of Mammalogy. View via Publisher.

Foundations and Assumptions

Baird, T. Lizards and other reptiles as model systems for the study of contest behaviour. Hardy and M.

0 comments

Leave a reply