reinforcement reward and intrinsic motivation a meta analysis pdf

Reinforcement reward and intrinsic motivation a meta analysis pdf

File Name: reinforcement reward and intrinsic motivation a meta analysis .zip
Size: 2758Kb
Published: 12.04.2021

Evaluations of the Overjustification Hypothesis

Access options

REFERENCES

The overjustification effect occurs when an expected external incentive such as money or prizes decreases a person's intrinsic motivation to perform a task. Overjustification is an explanation for the phenomenon known as motivational "crowding out. Once rewards are no longer offered, interest in the activity is lost; prior intrinsic motivation does not return, and extrinsic rewards must be continuously offered as motivation to sustain the activity. The overjustification effect has been widely demonstrated in many settings.

Evaluations of the Overjustification Hypothesis

Bruno, Bruna : Reconciling economics and psychology on intrinsic motivation. The paper analyzes how the debate on intrinsic motivation was imported from psychology into economics. The most important differences between the two disciplines are in the definition of intrinsic motivation and in the timing of the undermining effect of rewards. The economic framework of inter-temporal choices is proposed to reconcile the different empirical and theoretical results arising in the literature, and it is shown how rewards induce substitution and income effects depending on whether they are transitory or permanent. Furthermore, a distinction between input and output oriented intrinsic motivation is introduced. Andreoni, J. Bohnet, I.

In this chapter, I review research on the consequences of extrinsic and intrinsic motivation, and conclude that intrinsic motivation is a far more efficient type of motivation than is extrinsic motivation. I also review research on the Job Characteristics Theory JCT and Self-Determination Theory SDT to pinpoint the most important antecedents to intrinsic motivation, and to show that highly performance-contingent pay can have a detrimental effect on intrinsic motivation, also outside the laboratory. Most, if not all managers understand the importance of having a motivated workforce, but many think about work motivation as a unidimensional construct where the strength of the motivation is the key. In addition, managers have their own personal theories or assumptions about human motivation. McGregor , for instance, argued that managers differed in their assumptions about an average employee at work. Theory X-managers assume that an average employee dislikes work and attempts to avoid work, needs direction, avoids responsibility, lacks ambition, and is motivated by self-interest and maximizing of income. Theory Y-managers, however, assume that an average employee likes to work, has self-control and direction, seeks responsibility and is motivated to work well and to develop skills and abilities, and desires to participate in tasks that advance worthy organizational goals.

The purpose of the present investigation was to extend the research related to the possible negative side effects of extrinsic reinforcement on children's compliant behavior, particularly the overjustification effect. Specifically, this study examined the effects of a token reinforcement procedure in a naturalistic environment third grade classroom on children's compliance with classroom rules. Three students exhibiting high compliance with classroom rules were selected. Results indicated that the introduction of a token reinforcement program contingent on the occurrence of rule compliance had no detrimental effect on their rule compliant behavior following the withdrawal of the token procedure i. Thus, the overjustification effect was not supported. This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Access options

The overjustification effect occurs when an expected external incentive such as money or prizes decreases a person's intrinsic motivation to perform a task. Overjustification is an explanation for the phenomenon known as motivational "crowding out. Once rewards are no longer offered, interest in the activity is lost; prior intrinsic motivation does not return, and extrinsic rewards must be continuously offered as motivation to sustain the activity. The overjustification effect has been widely demonstrated in many settings. In one of the earliest demonstrations of this effect, Edward Deci and his colleagues conducted a laboratory experiment in where subjects showing baseline interest in solving a puzzle were exposed to two different conditions.


This article reviews research on the effects of reinforcement/reward on intrinsic motivation. The main meta-analysis included 96 experimental studies that used.


REFERENCES

Required Tools. Contact Center. OJS User Guides.

Overjustification effect

Skip to search form Skip to main content You are currently offline. Some features of the site may not work correctly.

12.1 Introduction

Print Send Add Share. Notes Abstract: The utility of reinforcement-based procedures has been well established in the behavior analysis literature. The overjustification effect is one commonly cited criticism of programs that usetangible rewards. Rewards are frequently delivered in school settings andinclude grades, stickers, social praise, and star charts. The overjustification hypothesis suggests that the delivery of an extrinsic socially mediated reward contingent on engagement with an activity that previously occurs at somelevel without apparent socially mediated reinforcement will result in a reduction in the amount of engagement in that activity from baseline levelswhen the reward phase is discontinued.

The purpose of the present investigation was to extend the research related to the possible negative side effects of extrinsic reinforcement on children's compliant behavior, particularly the overjustification effect. Specifically, this study examined the effects of a token reinforcement procedure in a naturalistic environment third grade classroom on children's compliance with classroom rules. Three students exhibiting high compliance with classroom rules were selected. Results indicated that the introduction of a token reinforcement program contingent on the occurrence of rule compliance had no detrimental effect on their rule compliant behavior following the withdrawal of the token procedure i. Thus, the overjustification effect was not supported. Download to read the full article text. Akin, K.

1 comments

  • Brigitte A. 20.04.2021 at 18:16

    Several researchers draw a distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic motiva tion. Intrinsically motivated behaviors are ones for which there is no apparent reward.

    Reply

Leave a reply