difference between inclusive education and integrated education pdf

Difference between inclusive education and integrated education pdf

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Difference Between Special Education, Inclusive Education And Integrated Education?

A strategic approach supports successful integration.

Integration and Inclusion: 6 Steps to Student Success

Study of Education. In this article you will understand what is the main difference between Special Education, Integrated Education and Inclusive Education.

Inclusion in education refers to a model wherein students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-special general education needs students. It arise in the context of special education with an individualized education program or plan , and is built on the notion that it is more effective for students with special needs to have said mixed experience for them to be more successful in social interactions leading to further success in life. Inclusion rejects but still provides the use of special schools or classrooms to separate students with disabilities from students without disabilities. Schools with inclusive classrooms do not believe in separate classrooms. They do not have their own separate world so they have to learn how to operate with students while being less focused on by teachers due to a higher student to teacher ratio.

Difference Between Special Education, Inclusive Education And Integrated Education?

Research shows that there are different types of schools that offer different approaches towards providing quality education for all. This activity will enable teachers to understand the differences between different types of schools and to begin to develop their own definition of inclusive education. Highlight characteristics you believe to be important and complete your own definition. Inclusive education means education in which all children are welcome in the same classroom and provided with high-quality instruction and the support tools needed to succeed. Handicap International, n. If the right to education for all is to become a reality, we must ensure that all learners have access to quality education that meets basic learning needs and enriches lives.

A strategic approach supports successful integration.

Are you familiar with the difference between integration and inclusion when it comes to the classroom environment? The trend in education today is moving away from integration and toward inclusion. While both approaches aim to bring students with disabilities into the mainstream classroom, one system expects students to adapt to the pre-existing structure, while the other ensures the existing education system will adapt to each student. An integrated classroom is a setting where students with disabilities learn alongside peers without disabilities. Extra supports may be implemented to help them adapt to the regular curriculum, and sometimes separate special education programs are in place within the classroom or through pull-out services. In theory, integration is a positive approach that seeks to help students with disabilities be part of the larger group. In practicality, the differences in the way all people learn can make this system of education less effective overall.

Inclusive school communities are educational settings in which students with disabilities have opportunities to participate and receive support in all aspects of school life alongside peers who do not have disabilities. In an inclusive system, special educators, specialized instructional support personnel, general educators, and other education personnel work together to address the needs of students with disabilities. By collaborating, these educators better support the learning and participation of all students. Furthermore, research demonstrates that a learning community is better, richer, and more effective when students with disabilities are full participants. Although many strides have been made in realizing the intent of the law, schools often still treat inclusive education as a new and challenging way of supporting students with disabilities. Too often, separateness and exclusion can define the educational experience, particularly for students with the most significant cognitive disabilities. Despite the slow rate of implementation and the challenges involved, educators, students, and families have found many compelling reasons to support inclusive education for students with and without disabilities.


An integrated classroom is a setting where students with disabilities learn alongside peers without disabilities. Inclusion is the actual merging of special education and regular education with the belief that all children are different, will learn differently, and should have full access to the same curriculum.


Integration and Inclusion: 6 Steps to Student Success

Inclusive education is about looking at the ways our schools, classrooms, programs and lessons are designed so that all children can participate and learn. Inclusion is also about finding different ways of teaching so that classrooms actively involve all children. It also means finding ways to develop friendships, relationships and mutual respect between all children, and between children and teachers in the school. Inclusive education is not just for some children. Being included is not something that a child must be ready for.

A strategic approach supports successful integration.

His writings 1 and talks 2 have helped to clarify the stakes involved with each of these options. A hundred years ago, in most parts of the world, children showing any major peculiarities were not sent to school at all and were, in general, excluded from society. In France or in Switzerland, in the 20th century, specialized institutions like IME Institut Medico Educatif or CMP Centre Medico Pedagogique were progressively developed and offered children learning conditions which were adapted to whatever handicap they might have. Although the idea behind the development of such options came with good intentions, it still meant, for these young people, a situation of segration , relegating them to the margins of society. Beginning in the s there was a new policy adopted for assuring the education of these young people. But this plan had its limits.

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