comparative and superlatives adjectives pdf

Comparative and superlatives adjectives pdf

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What is a comparative adjective?

Comparative and superlative adjectives – article

A superlative adjective is used when you compare three or more things.

An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield covering ways to approach teaching comparatives and superlatives. One way of describing a person or thing is by saying that they have more of a particular quality than someone or something else. It is also possible to describe someone or something by saying that they have more of a particular quality than any other of their kind. We do this by using superlative adjectives, which are formed by adding -est at the end of the adjective and placing the before it, or placing the most before the adjective, e.

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An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield covering ways to approach teaching comparatives and superlatives. One way of describing a person or thing is by saying that they have more of a particular quality than someone or something else. It is also possible to describe someone or something by saying that they have more of a particular quality than any other of their kind.

We do this by using superlative adjectives, which are formed by adding -est at the end of the adjective and placing the before it, or placing the most before the adjective, e. One syllable adjectives generally form the comparative by adding -er and the superlative by adding -est , e.

Here are three examples. The comparative of ill is worse , and the comparative of well is better , e. The usual comparative and superlative forms of the adjective old are older and oldest.

However, the alternative forms elder and eldest are sometimes used. Elder and eldest are generally restricted to talking about the age of people, especially people within the same family, and are not used to talk about the age of things, e. Elder cannot occur in the predicative position after link verbs such as be , become , get , e. Comparatives and superlatives of compound adjectives are generally formed by using more and most , e.

Common examples of adjectives like these are: complete , equal , favourite , and perfect. Just like other adjectives, comparatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, e.

Comparatives are very commonly followed by than and a pronoun or noun group, in order to describe who the other person or thing involved in the comparison is, e. Two comparatives can be contrasted by placing the before them, indicating that a change in one quality is linked to a change in another, e. Two comparatives can also be linked with and to show a continuing increase in a particular quality, e.

Like comparatives, superlatives can be placed before nouns in the attributive position, or occur after be and other link verbs, e. As shown in the second two examples, superlatives are often used on their own if it is clear what or who is being compared. If you want to be specific about what you are comparing, you can do this with a noun, or a phrase beginning with in or of, e.

Another way of being specific is by placing a relative clause after the superlative, e. Note that if the superlative occurs before the noun, in the attributive position, the in or of phrase or relative clause comes after the noun, eg. Although the usually occurs before a superlative, it is sometimes left out in informal speech or writing, e. Sometimes possessive pronouns are used instead of the before a superlative, e. Ordinal numbers are often used with superlatives to indicate that something has more of a particular quality than most others of its kind, e.

In informal conversation, superlatives are often used instead of comparatives when comparing two things. For example, when comparing a train journey and car journey to Edinburgh, someone might say: the train is quickest , rather than: the train is quicker. Superlatives are not generally used in this way in formal speech and writing.

If we want to talk about a quality which is smaller in amount relative to others, we use the forms less the opposite of comparative more , and the least the opposite of superlative the most. Less is used to indicate that something or someone does not have as much of a particular quality as someone or something else, e. The least is used to indicate that something or someone has less of a quality than any other person or thing of its kind, e. An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on ways to approach teaching the present perfect aspect.

Articles, tips and activities covering everything you need to know about verbs and tenses, including reported speech, passives and modals. Our experts provide a compendium of tips and ideas for teaching nouns, prepositions and relative clauses in English.

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Skip to main content Skip to navigation. Support for teaching grammar. No comments. Source: SerjioLe, iStockphoto. The street has become quieter since they left.

You should be more sensible. John is taller than me. The more stressed you are, the worse it is for your health. Her illness was becoming worse and worse. He became more and more tired as the weeks went by. This one is the cheapest of the new designs. The cathedral is the second most popular tourist attraction. She was the least intelligent of the three sisters.

Adjectives 1 Adjectives. Adjectives and noun modifiers in English — article. Adjectives and noun modifiers in English — tips and activities. Currently reading Comparative and superlative adjectives — article. Comparative and superlative adjectives — tips and activities. Related articles. Article Reported speech — tips and activities Tips and ideas from Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on teaching reported speech. Article Reported speech 2 — article An article by Kerry Maxwell and Lindsay Clandfield on approaches to teaching reported speech.

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Article Nouns and phrases Our experts provide a compendium of tips and ideas for teaching nouns, prepositions and relative clauses in English. Article Adjectives Articles, tips and activities on teaching adjectives, from our panel of expert authors.

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What is a comparative adjective?

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Comparative Form The descriptive form is used to describe one noun or pronoun. Change the adjective to a comparative or a superlative form. There are less people here than promised to come. Fill in the gaps with the comparative form of the adjectives given. Exercise 1: 1. Give it a try. Exercise 2: 1.

After you have reviewed this free English lesson make sure to download it so you can use it for homework or in your English class. If a word ends with a consonant-vowel-consonant, double the last letter except if the word ends with a w, x, or z. The president is the most important person in the USA. Complete the sentences with the most appropriate comparative or superlative phrase of the adjective given. Book with confidence! Start your download now!

Comparative and superlative adjectives – article

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A comparative adjective is used to compare two nouns denoting a higher or lower degree of quality with respect to one another. For example, Aharsi is stronger than Advik. In this sentence strength of Aharsi and Advik are compared and it is informed that Aharsi has more strength. Here, the adjective stronger is showing the comparative form of the adjective strong.

Comparative adjectives are used to compare one noun to another noun. In these instances, only two items are being compared. For example, someone might say that "the blue bird is angrier than the robin. Superlative adjectives are used to compare three or more nouns. They're also used to compare one thing against the rest of a group.

Comparative and superlative adjectives – article

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